Bird Classification in Baraminology

Gulls Flying

The primary feature of the bird cognitum is feathers. Other features include the wings, beaks, and feet generally adapted for perching (sometimes swimming). Birds are warm-blooded (including a four-chambered heart), lay eggs, usually build nests, and most are able to fly. Some birds also make use of aquatic habitats by wading, swimming, or diving while a few others are land acclimated as well.

The Major Leaps Required for the Evolution of Birds

Evolutionism presents a simple picture of change over time, but if you look at the details, there is a staggering amount of change that needs to occur to make one type of animal into another. It is stated that birds evolved from reptiles. Yet here are some changes that needed to occur for this to happen: scales had to turn into feathers, it had to go from ectothermic to endothermic, bidirectional lungs into unidirectional lungs for flying, a 3 chambered to 4 chambered heart, and the development of wings and wing muscles from legs. Furthermore, there are no transitional fossils to show this occurred, only complete bird fossils.

Bird Baramin

Initial studies into the bird cognitum have given a tentative 196 Created Kinds. Much work has yet to be done in this field and as data from continued studies and hybridization records are found, that number could change.

The following lists follow the current data and research using traditional taxonomic methods with an emphasis on hybridization, which results in a higher number of Kinds. Quite often, statistical baraminology will result in fewer numbers of Kinds – with the birds this especially means grouping a number of families together at the superfamily level. [For more information on this, please read Lumpers and Splitters.] This list also primarily follows the work of Jean Lightner [Lightner 2013] and deals with extant species. 196 Kinds equated at the ranks of: 14 Order, 1 Superfamily, and 170 Family.

– G: S:
Acanthisittibar
– New Zealand Wren Kind G:2 S:2
Acanthizibar
– Australasian Warbler Kind G:14 S:65
Accipitribar
– Hawk Kind G:65 S:256
Acrocephalibar
– Reed Warbler Kind G:5 S:61
Aegithalibar
– Bushtit Kind G:4 S:13
Aegithinibar
– Loras Kind G:1 S:4
Aegothelibar
– Owlet-nightjar Kind G:1 S:10
Alaudibar
– Lark Kind G:20 S:98
Alcedinibar
– Kingfisher Kind G:19 S:95
Anatibar
– Duck Kind G:49 S:172
Anhimibar
– Screamer Kind G:2 S:3
Anhingibar
– Anhinga Kind G:1 S:4
Anseranatibar
– Magpie Goos Kind G:1 S:1
Apodibar
– Swift Kind G:19 S:105
Apterygibar
– Kiwi Kind G:1 S:5
Aramibar
– Limpkin Kind G:1 S:1
Arcanatoribar
– Dapple-throat Kind G:3 S:3
Ardenibar
– Heron Kind G:19 S:72
Artamibar
– Woodswallow Kind G:1 S:11
Atrichornithibar
– Scrub-bird Kind G:1 S:2
Balaenicipitibar
– Shoebill Kind G:1 S:1
Bernieribar
– Malagasy Warbler Kind G:8 S:11
Bombycillibar
– Waxwing Kind G:1 S:3
Brachypteracinibar
– Ground Roller Kind G:4 S:5
Bucconibar
– Puffbird Kind G:10 S:36
Bucerotibar
– Hornbill Kind G:13 S:59
Bucorvibar
– Ground Hornbill Kind G:1 S:2
Buphagibar
– Oxpecker Kind G:1 S:2
Callaenibar
– New Zealand Wattlebird Kind G:3 S:5
Campephagibar
– Cuckooshrike Kind G:6 S:92
Capitonibar
– New World Barbets G:2 S:15
Caprimulgibar
– Nightjar Kind G:21 S:95
Cariamebar
– Seriema Kind G:2 S:2
Casuarinibar
– Cassowary Kind G:1 S:3
Cathartibar
– New World Vulture Kind G:3 S:7
Certhinibar
– Treecreeper Kind G:2 S:11
Cettibar
– Cettia Bush Warbler Kind G:7 S:32
Chaetopibar
– Rockjumper Kind G:1 S:2
Charadrinebar
– Shorebird Kind F: 18 G:? S:368
Chloropsenibar
– Leafbird Kind G:1 S:11
Ciconinebar
– Stork Kind G:6 S:19
Cinclibar
– Dipper Kind G:1 S:5
Cisticolibar
– Cisticola Kind G:29 S:160
Climacteribar
– Australian Treecreeper Kind G:2 S:7
Cnemophilibar
– Satinbird Kind G:2 S:3
Colinebar
– Mousebird Kind G:2 S:6
Columbebar
– Dove Kind G:45 S:335
Conopophagibar
– Gnateater Kind G:2 S:11
Coracinibar
– Roller Kind G:2 S:12
Corcoracibar
– Australian Mudnester Kind G:1 S:2
Corvibar
– Crow Kind G:23 S:130
Cotingibar
– Cotinga Kind G:24 S:64
Cracticibar
– Butcherbird Kind G:4 S:12
Cuculebar
– Cuckoo Kind G:30 S:150
Dasyornithibar
– Bristlebird Kind G:1 S:3
Dicaenibar
– Flowerpecker Kind G:2 S:48
Dicruribar
– Drongo Kind G:2 S:26
Diomedenibar
– Albatross Kind G:4 S:21
Donacobinibar
– Black-capped Donacobius Kind G:1 S:1
Dromainibar
– Emu Kind G:1 S:1
Dulibar
– Palmchat Kind G:1 S:1
Erythrocercibar
– Yellow Flycatcher Kind G:1 S:3
Eupetibar
– Rail-babbler Kind G:1 S:1
Eurylaimibar
– Broadbill Kind G:12 S:20
Eurypygibar
– Sunbittern Kind G:1 S:1
Falconebar
– Falcon Kind G:11 S:67
Formicarinibar
– Anththrush Kind G:2 S:12
Fregatibar
– Frigatebird Kind G:1 S:5
Furnarinibar
– Ovenbird Kind G:70 S:307
Galbulibar
– Jacamar Kind G:5 S:18
Gallebar
– Landfowl Kind G:5 S:299
Gavinibar
– Loon Kind G:1 S:5
Grallarinibar
– Antpitta Kind G:4 S:51
Gruibar
– Crane Kind G:2 S:15
Heliornithibar
– Finfoot Kind G:3 S:3
Hemiprocnibar
– Treeswift Kind G:1 S:4
Hirundinibar
– Swallow Kind G:19 S:88
Hydrobatibar
– Storm Petrel Kind G:7 S:24
Hyliotibar
– Hyliota Kind G:1 S:4
Hylocitrenibar
– Hylocitrea Kind G:1 S:1
Hypocolinibar
– Hypocolius Kind G:1 S:1
Idicatoribar
– Honeyguide Kind G:4 S:17
Irenibar
– Fairy-bluebird Kind G:1 S:2
Laninibar
– Shrike Kind G:4 S:33
Leiothrichibar
– Laughingthrush Kind G:13 S:133
Leptosomebar
– Cuckoo Roller Kind G:1 S:1
Locustellibar
– Grassbird Kind G:9 S:57
Lybinibar
– African Barbet Kind G:7 S:42
Machaerirhynchibar
– Boatbill Kind G:1 S:2
Macrosphenibar
– African Warbler Kind G:6 S:18
Malaconotibar
– Brushshrike Kind G:7 S:50
Maluribar
– Australasian Wren Kind G:6 S:29
Megalaimibar
– Asian Barbet Kind G:3 S:30
Melanocharitibar
– Berrypecker Kind G:4 S:10
Melanopareinibar
– Crescentchest Kind G:1 S:4
Meliphagibar
– Honeyeater Kind G:42 S:184
Menuribar
– Lyrebird Kind G:1 S:2
Meropibar
– Bee-eater Kind G:3 S:27
Mesitornithebar
– Mesite Kind G:2 S:3
Mimibar
– Mockingbird Kind G:10 S:34
Mohonibar
– Oo Kind G:2 S:5
Momotibar
– Motmot Kind G:6 S:14
Monarchibar
– Monarch Kind G:16 S:98
Muscicapibar
– Old World Flycatcher Kind G:51 S:298
Musophagebar
– Turaco Kind G:6 S:23
Nectarininibar
– Sunbird Kind G:16 S:139
Neosittibar
– Sitella Kind G:1 S:3
Nicatoribar
– Nicator Kind G:1 S:3
Notiomystibar
– Stichbird Kind G:1 S:1
Nyctibinibar
– Potoo Kind G:1 S:7
Opisthocomebar
– Hoatzin Kind G:1 S:1
Oriolibar
– Old World Oriole Kind G:3 S:34
Orthonychibar
– Longrunner Kind G:1 S:3
Otidebar
– Bustard Kind G:11 S:26
Pachycephalibar
– Whistler Kind G:8 S:58
Pandionibar
– Osprey Kind G:1 S:2
Panuribar
– Bearded Reedling Kind G:1 S:1
Paradisaenibar
– Bird-of-Paradise Kind G:16 S:41
Paramythinibar
– Painted Berrypecker Kind G:2 S:2
Pardalotibar
– Pardalote Kind G:1 S:4
Paribar
– Tit Kind G:8 S:59
Passeriabar
– Finch Kind G:? S:1471
Pelecanibar
– Pelican Kind G:1 S:8
Pelecanoidibar
– Diving Petrel Kind G:1 S:4
Pellornenibar
– Ground Babbler Kind G:14 S:71
Petroicibar
– Australasian Robin Kind G:14 S:46
Phaethontebar
– Tropicbird Kind G:1 S:3
Phalacrocoracibar
– Cormorant Kind G:3 S:41
Phoenicopteribar
– Flamingo Kind G:1 S:6
Phoeniculibar
– Wood Hoopoe Kind G:2 S:9
Phylloscopibar
– Leaf Warbler Kind G:2 S:77
Picathartibar
– Rockfowl Kind G:1 S:2
Picibar
– Woodpecker Kind G:30 S:232
Pipribar
– Manakin Kind G:14 S:52
Pittibar
– Pitta Kind G:3 S:33
Pityriasenibar
– Bristlehead Kind G:1 S:1
Platysteiribar
– Batis Kind G:5 S:33
Pnoepygibar
– Cupwing Kind G:1 S:4
Podargibar
-Frogmouth Kind G:3 S:16
Podicipedebar
– Grebe Kind G:6 S:23
Polioptilibar
– Gnatcatcher Kind G:3 S:17
Pomatostomibar
– Australasian Babbler Kind G:2 S:5
Prionopibar
– Helmetshrike Kind G:1 S:8
Procellarinibar
– Petrel Kind G:14 S:90
Promeropibar
– Sugarbird Kind G:1 S:2
Psittacebar
– Parrot Kind F:3 G: S:363
Psophinibar
– Trumpeter Kind G:1 S:3
Psophodibar
– Whipbird Kind G:4 S:16
Pteroclebar
– Sandgrouse Kind G:2 S:16
Ptilogonatibar
– Silky-flycatcher Kind G:3 S:4
Ptilonorhynchibar
– Bowerbird Kind G:8 S:20
Pycnonotibar
– Bulbul Kind G:22 S:151
Rallibar
– Rail Kind G:38 S:151
Ramphastibar
– Toucan Kind G:5 S:46
Regulibar
– Kinglet Kind G:1 S:6
Remizibar
– Penduline Tit Kind G:4 S:12
Rhenibar
– Rhea Kind G:1 S:2
Rhinocryptibar
– Tapaculo Kind G:12 S:56
Rhipiduribar
– Fantail Kind G:2 S:49
Rhynochetibar
– Kagu Kind G:1 S:1
Sagittarinibar
– Secretarybird Kind G:1 S:1
Sarothruribar
– Flufftail Kind G:1 S:9
Scopibar
– Hamerkop Kind G:1 S:1
Scotocercibar
– Streaked Scrub Warbler Kind G:1 S:1
Semnornithibar
– Toucan Barbet Kind G:1 S:2
Sittibar
– Nuthatch Kind G:1 S:28
Spheniscebar
– Penguin Kind G:6 S:18
Steatornithibar
– Oilbird Kind G:1 S:1
Stenostiribar
– Fairy Flycatcher Kind G:4 S:9
Strigibar
– Owl Kind G:25 S:211
Struthionibar
– Ostrich Kind G:1 S:2
Sturnibar
– Starling Kind G:6 S:123
Sylvinibar
– Sylviid Babbler Kind G:19 S:70
Tephrodornithibar
– Woodshrike Kind G:3 S:8
Thamnophilibar
– Antbird Kind G:45 S:228
Threskiornithibar
– Ibis Kind G:13 S:35
Tichodromibar
– Wallcreeper Kind G:1 S:1
Timalinibar
– Babbler Kind G:10 S:56
Tinamebar
– Tinamous Kind G:9 S:47
Tityribar
– Tityra Kind G:7 S:45
Todibar
– Tody Kind G:1 S:5
Trochilibar
– Hummingbird Kind G:100 S:342
Troglodytibar
– Wren Kind G:19 S:83
Trogonebar
– Trogon Kind G:7 S:43
Turdibar
– Thrush Kind G:20 S:185
Turnicebar
– Buttonquail Kind G:1 S:17
Tyrannibar
– Tyrant Flycatcher Kind G:97 S:421
Tytonibar
– Barn Owl Kind G:2 S:18
Upupibar
– Hoopoe Kind G:1 S:3
Vangibar
– Vanga Kind G:15 S:21
Vireonibar
– Vireo Kind G:6 S:63
Zosteropibar
– White-eye Kind G:13 S:128
– G: S:
– G: S:

debatable – mahoua kind – incertae sedis – also melampittat kind IS4 : Hylia IS5 :

Bird Cognitum

Flightless Bird Cognitum

Many of the flightless birds in the world belong to what is called a Ratite group. The trait they share in common is a flat breastbone without a keel on the sternum, known as a ratite breastbone. This anatomical feature prevents them from being able to fly. Generally speaking, the following Kinds have similarities which might suggest a larger grouping, but no hybridization data is known to support that concept.

Last Updated: 28/10/2016
Todd Elder

Todd Elder

Todd Elder has a deep desire to understand and experience Creation. As a Baraminologist, his current research includes developing the Katagenos Species Concept, the Natanzera Classification System, and the Floral Formula Method of determining Plant Kinds. As an author and speaker, his books and seminar materials are designed to encourage a growing relationship with the Creator.
Todd Elder

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